Day Time Slow Shutter Photography Tutorial

1. Set up tripod and place camera on it.

2. Put the camera in bulb mode.

Image by http://valeriehayken.com
Image by http://valeriehayken.com

3. Fcus the camera and if your lens is set to auto be sure to set the lens to manual so that it does not refocus.

Image by http://www.discoverdigitalphotography.com
Image by http://www.discoverdigitalphotography.com
4. Screw on your neutral density filter and make sure it’s tightly screwed so that light does not bleed
through a crack or opening near the thread.
5. Plug in the shutter button/remote.

Image by https://www.amazon.com
Image by https://www.amazon.com
6. Adjust the cameras settings to f11 so that there’s less of a chance of creating a shallow depth of field look.
7. Set the cameras iso to 100 or as dark as the camera allows you to set it so that the image doesn’t get
overexposed during the time you’re taking the photo.

Image by Baylen Whitfield
Image by Baylen Whitfield
8. Take a photo/open the shutter (maybe about 20 seconds depending on the amount of light outside) to
test the amount of exposure you need.
9. After testing, take a few photos to have some to choose the best of from.
10. Carefully pack away gear and edit your photos when you get time, if you choose to do so.
 Youtube video description:

This is a quick video to show you how to perform basic slow shutter photography during the day without over exposing your photos.

Product Links:

Canon Remote Switch RS60 E3 – https://www.amazon.com/Canon-Remote-S…
Hoya Neutral Density Filters – https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss…

Thanks for watching!

Here is the image from my video tutorial above once touched up in LightRoom.

Image by Baylen Whitfield
Image by Baylen Whitfield
 Here are additional examples of slow shutter photos I’ve taken during the day!
Image by Baylen Whitfield
Image by Baylen Whitfield
Image by Baylen Whitfield
Image by Baylen Whitfield
Image by Baylen Whitfield
Image by Baylen Whitfield
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