Toxic Teams Are Bad Don’t Ya Know

Almost everyone has dealt with a toxic team over their life, or at least a toxic person. This is most likely one of the least fun things in life since it is neither constructive or enjoyable. Many times we run into toxic people or teams in places where we spend the most time such as work or school. It is unfortunate that this happens, but instead of sitting there like a stick in the mud all grumpy-like, you can do something about it to fix it. If you have a toxic team on your hands, it doesn’t have to be like that. The Geek Leader’s Handbook shows us ways to combat toxicity and turn your team around so that they can be cooperating and contributing members of your school or company.

Personally, I cannot think of a time where I have been apart of an entire team that was toxic, but I have definitely dealt with toxic people. Let me tell ya, there are many things I would rather do than have to interact with them at all let alone on a consistent basis at my job. Toxic behavior can have a wide range of things and is not just limited to rudeness or a bad temper. It can include things like not communicating well with your peers or other members of your team. This can be extremely annoying and counterproductive when everyone on your team needs to be filled in and up to date about everything that is going on with your project. Another example of toxic behavior would be showing anger, impatience, or outbursts directed at your co-workers. This is not only impolite and rude, but also childish as well. I do not think that anyone is genuinely motivated in the workplace by having someone berate them whether it is one on one or in front of the whole office. This is a sign of insecurity and will not get accomplish anything or get anything done. One more sign of toxicity could simply be what you don’t do. If someone just sits around and does not input much to the group, then they are just taking up space. Many people may have some great ideas that can really get things rolling and help get your team moving in the right direction, but they are either scared to voice their opinions, or just do not care enough to see the team succeed. They may be content and comfortable with where they are currently at the company and with what they have been doing and have no desire to do anything more than that. All of these examples are problems when it is your job to motivate your team to work together. Their actions seem unable to be fixed. However, there is always a silver lining. They can as a matter of fact be fixed. The first step is to identify the toxic behavior which is what we just did. Once that is done, you are going to want to claim and assign responsibility. As the leader of the group, you’re going to have to suck it up and take responsibility for the way they have been acting, because to be fair you are the one who is supposed to be leading them. Next, you want to choose how you’re going to intervene in a way that will address their behavior, not their emotions that is forceful to let them know that you want to break away from the past actions. Finally, you are going to want to implement these interventions and focus on what is at hand for the future.

Personally, I cannot think of a time where I have been apart of an entire team that was toxic, but I have definitely dealt with toxic people. Let me tell ya, there are many things I would rather do than have to interact with them at all let alone on a consistent basis at my job. Toxic behavior can have a wide range of things and is not just limited to rudeness or a bad temper. It can include things like not communicating well with your peers or other members of your team. This can be extremely annoying and counterproductive when everyone on your team needs to be filled in and up to date about everything that is going on with your project. Another example of toxic behavior would be showing anger, impatience, or outbursts directed at your co-workers. This is not only impolite and rude, but also childish as well. I do not think that anyone is genuinely motivated in the workplace by having someone berate them whether it is one on one or in front of the whole office. This is a sign of insecurity and will not get accomplish anything or get anything done. One more sign of toxicity could simply be what you don’t do. If someone just sits around and does not input much to the group, then they are just taking up space. Many people may have some great ideas that can really get things rolling and help get your team moving in the right direction, but they are either scared to voice their opinions, or just do not care enough to see the team succeed. They may be content and comfortable with where they are currently at the company and with what they have been doing and have no desire to do anything more than that. All of these examples are problems when it is your job to motivate your team to work together. Their actions seem unable to be fixed. However, there is always a silver lining. They can as a matter of fact be fixed. The first step is to identify the toxic behavior which is what we just did. Once that is done, you are going to want to claim and assign responsibility. As the leader of the group, you’re going to have to suck it up and take responsibility for the way they have been acting, because to be fair you are the one who is supposed to be leading them. Next, you want to choose how you’re going to intervene in a way that will address their behavior, not their emotions that is forceful to let them know that you want to break away from the past actions. Finally, you are going to want to implement these interventions and focus on what is at hand for the future.

Dealing with a toxic team is just about as appealing as coming to class in negative temperatures or taking a shower that is all out of warm water. However, there is still hope for all of you magnificent managers who are just trying to do your best. If you actively take steps to correct the behavior, then you’ll be on the road to success in no time.